Press Release Distribution Methods - CarsonPR Press Release Distribution Methods - CarsonPR

With all the different ways of distributing your press releases, or press kit which is the most productive method? Is it email, snail mail, special delivery letters, registered mail, courier service?

There isn’t anyone specific way to reach a reporter and have them read your release. What? You thought there was a magic process. I can offer this, the methods that most reporters, editors, and journalists prefer.

First, let’s review the email process since it is the newest form of communication. Do reporters and their peers prefer this? Most do not. What they prefer is you tell them in a very short message (maybe 30 words of less) that you will be sending a press release, or story for their review. Tell them what will be in the subject line so they will be watching for it. The reason you shouldn’t send them the release initially is their "in box" gets full quickly, everyday.

Think of all the junk email you receive. Well, reporters are not protected from emails that should have been directed to another person, or department. So what they will do is delete most messages, unless it is from someone they know (remember when I said you need to build a relationship, well this is when it helps), or are looking for a message that you sent them about a release that was coming.

And don’t send them CD’s or a lot of downloaded information. Keep it short, and to the point.

As for methods of sending, yes, traditional snail mail is still the most widely accepted. Because reporters like organizing files on their desk and making notes on releases and stories they receive.

All the forms of communication are good. What makes a release get noticed is the follow-up. Phone calls and follow-up emails are good. But don’t be annoying; be considerate. Keep a log of what and how you sent your release to the reporter. This will keep you organized and know what works best for you. If you need help writing a good release, try contacting a professional so that you can learn how to communicate like a pr pro.

If you want to discuss this further, give me a call. I’ll point you in the right direction.

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